Letter Lust

4.04.2012

Photobucket
{this text, with its ornate details, intricacy and boldness, appropriately fits the words displayed}



I've always been fascinated with compelling design, whether it be in the form of a window display at a clothing store (Anthropologie is consistently innovative with theirs), a website, or a magazine layout. This video not only incorporates a series of stimulating graphic elements with its unique typefaces, swift mesmerizing motions, and a simplicity that perfectly parallels its uncomplicated messages that highlight "what not to do." As I often feel that my life is one perpetual to-do list, it was nice to be reminded of what is truly important to focus on--spontaneity, gratitude, meaningful relationships, single-tasking, learning, and enjoying the great outdoors.

Words, like anything else, become all the more appealing when displayed in an aesthetically pleasing fashion. These following words are equally beautiful in their context and artistic display. In a world where we rarely put pen to paper, these fonts demonstrate how our technologically-driven generation provides us with a wide range of ways to display words. These variations serve two-fold: of course, making the text more attractive and to more effectively get across the message in a way that complements the words themselves.

Photobucket
Some take a minimalistic approach.

Photobucket
Then there's mixing of scripts and regular serif typefaces...
Photobucket
or sans-serif type with increased leading,

Photobucket
to "handwritten" text,
Photobucket
to sketched fonts, (which are becoming all the rage and remind me of my sister's video)
Photobucket
to size,

Photobucket
to simplicity and alignment,

Photobucket
to capitalization.

While these facets of the type may seem subtle, they make our world of words tremendously more complex, intriguing and fascinating, especially for graphic-design-geeks like myself. The possibilities are endless, so think twice the next time you think that by resorting to print your paper in Times New Roman, that this seemingly mainstream selection excuses yourself from the world of graphic design.  Oftentimes, the way words are written can speak just as loudly as the words themselves.



0 comments: